Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Five People You See On The Train

If you come across a bunch of characters on your commute, you will appreciate this...


You know them, because you see them every day.

We hear their music (though they wear earbuds); know their friends’ names (though we try to tune them out); and we even know the towns in which they live. We know this because we’re creatures of habit, and get in the same train cars daily — just as they do — each at our respective stations.

They are commuters — and they are all going to and from New York City, or somewhere along the line. You’ll recognize some below, I hope, immediately.

The Mouthy Businessman

Yes, he’s covalently bonded to his cell, tablet, laptop and beverage (a Soviet-sized coffee). He eagerly awaits a wetwire for his interface, because life on the train without an outlet to charge/ interact with contacts/clients is unthinkable, as he texts, emails, FaceTimes, Skypes, calls…AND has zero regard for all around him while doing it. WiFi is his constitutional right—why ISN’T it available on the train?!?!?! His noise level can be Zeppelin-esque: After five minutes, you know more about how he drives company SEO, what his ROI is, and the slew of corporate acronyms he peppers his conversations with, than where the next stop is. Oh, and his admin is named Janice. Usually.

The Happy T(w)eens

Once, you were like them: young, unobservant of anything but the fact that YOU ARE GOING TO NEW YORK CITY!!!! They’re going in because school’s out (or they’re taking the day off), and they’re saying, “Yolo,” “SMH,” “swag,” “OMJAAAAY,” “OBVI!” “adorbs,” and love to live in the #hashtag realm. They’ll sit in the four- or five-seaters by the door so they can gab face-to-face (and they’re really social: Tweeting, Instagramming, Kik’ing, What’sApping, maybe Snapchatting—God forbid—and texting each other AS they gab). If they’ve a pal or two who couldn’t find a seat, they’ll lean over and talk to the exiled duo, and you, too, share in conversational nothings. This, for you, might be chalked up as sociological research: they talk about boys (often, as young girls, naturally, they’re boy-mad), shopping, school, clothing, and possibly, procuring fake IDs. Preferably, fake IDs that scan.

The Job Candidate

Brooks Brothers—or hopefully, better—hairline-striped blue/gray suit with an understated necktie draped over his crisp, dry-cleaned dress shirt; a light glow of sweat (perhaps) on the forehead; and a printed résumé next to the folded laptop in his briefcase or satchel. This fellow’s nervous, quiet, maybe zoning out with earbuds in, but mindful that he has a job interview in the concrete jungle. You see him; he’s awkward or quiescently worried (but hopeful). His posture tells you he has business to attend to, and is on a quest. For what, you ask? A quest for success.

The Power Woman

Business suits on women command tremendous respect. Six-figure salaries (of course!) match the well-accoutered figures of ladies who ignore what goes on around them, donning city-ready Ferragamo point-toe pumps, close-tailored one-lapel Prada two-piece pantsuits in black, with gemmy Armentas hanging from their earlobes, and the key accessory: a color blast from a Fendi Selleria Adele in poppy red, which holds phone, accessories, makeup, necessaries, and so forth. Such a woman ignores you; and, especially when she dons tastefully chic Cartier or Morgenthal Frederics, you ignore her—once you realize that she hasn’t the slightest interest in the train, except as a daily conveyance to her potent position in the greatest city in the world.

The Zen Commuter

However, amid this sea of human (dis)interest, there’s the still point of the turning locomotive world who IS. IN. THE. ZONE. His—or Her—Zone. For this Master of the Moving Moments on the iron horse, it is a time for gathering thoughts; contemplating the moment itself; reading; seeing; turning down the noise; and simply, Being. You know these people when you encounter them: they live in a state of commutational enlightenment. Call it “Metro-Nirvana,” if you will. Nothing phases them. Having taken the train for so long, these rail-riding gurus know the stops, the bumps, the conductors, and the slowdowns and speedups inherent along the line.

Now, we know other types: Those poor folks standing on a packed train by the doors for 45 minutes; that fellow trying to fit a bike onboard; the (understandably) selfish commuter whose bag and gear are in the middle seat just so no one sits next to him/her; the sympathetic soul who forgot a commuter pass or ticket and realizes, ugh—it’s cash only onboard, and on peak trains, they tack on an extra $4 for the ride.

If the train is about to move on past their stop, they know to push the white button on the ceiling to get the doors back open. They sense the moment (and the “BUNG” sound) when the pantograph (around Pelham) is raised en route, switching the power current. They have their rituals, too, just observe them and learn: when, exactly, they will rise and gather their things, prepared to leave the car, expertly; just how they will hoof it on the gummed-up, well-trod, crowded platforms, on the lower or upper levels; their preparations are always deft, once finally made, deliberately, to deal with the day they face in the city, as they have done time and again, during their years spent on these very same trains.

David Podgurski, a writer for ilovefc.com, commuted for three years to Manhattan as a graduate student, and still is often commuting (at all hours). In addition, he also was a proud employee for Metro-North Commuter Railroad, during the summer of 1993. These experiences made him all too familiar with the cast of characters that play a role in your morning commute.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Stamford Agenda

  • Paper Space Exhibition at The Lionheart Gallery


    Contact:          Cindy Clarke                         203.613.9163   For Immediate Release   Fairfield...

  • Leo Fuchs: Photography from Hollywood's Golden Age


    KMR Arts: Gallery in Washington Depot, Connecticut, Showcases Established and Emerging Photographers “Leo Fuchs photography exhibited at Trovare...

  • A Billion Bricks: LEGO® Galactic Travels


    November 23, 2015 - February 7, 2016, Mon.- Sat. 9am-5pm, Sunday 11am – 5pmThe amazing LEGO® universe returns to the Stamford Museum & Nature...

  • New Exhibition. Bjørn Okholm Skaarup: Carnival of the Animals


    October 31, 2015 - January 3, 2016 New Exhibition. Bjørn Okholm Skaarup: Carnival of the Animals Carnival of the Animals is Danish sculptor...

  • Sara Walker Nursery School registration is in full swing!


    Community. Caring. Respect. The JCC Sara Walker Nursery School offers preschool programs for children ages 2 to 4 and pre-K, with flexible...

  • Swimming Activities At The JCC


    Swim School at the J Mondays, Wednesdays or Sundays, September 9 – December 23, 2015 Grades K – 5. Where young children get a...

  • Stamford Museum & Nature Center Facility Use


    January 2 - December 31, After 5pm For a truly unique and memorable venue, host your event or meeting on the picturesque 118-acre former estate...

  • Terrific Tots!


    Wednesdays, Nov. 11 – Dec. 16, 9 am – 12 pm 15 – 22 months. Introduce your toddler to his or her first “drop-off” class experience....

  • Wonderful Ones


    Thursdays, Nov 12 – Dec. 17, 9:15 – 10:15 am 1 – 2 years. Join us for this Mommy/Daddy and Me Class led by Sandi Waldstreicher, JCC Sara...

  • Support Group for Blind and Visually-Impaired Adults


    Oct. 22, Nov. 24, Dec. 29, 1 – 2 pm Speakers discuss topics relevant to vision loss. Reservations required. Free to all. To register or for more...

  • Black Friday/Saturday Book Sale


    Admission is free. All Sale proceeds support Pequot Library's 700+ annual programs for adults and children, serving over 100,000 participants a...

  • Neshama Yoga


    Fridays, Sept. 11 – Dec. 18 (no class on Nov. 27), 9 – 10:30am Neshama Yoga is a fusion of Kundalini Yoga and Jewish spirituality....

  • Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer: The Musical


    Saturday, Nov. 28 at 3:00 pm Saturday, Nov. 28 at 7:00 pm   First airing in 1964, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer has become a beloved...

  • Daniel Nault; Performing Live at Table 104


    Daniel Nault- Musical Performer Acoustic Singer  Table104  203-388-8898

  • Family Fun at Advent Worskhop


    Join in the fun at the Round Hill Community Church’s annual Advent Workshop on Sunday, November 29 at 4pm.  Families and friends gather at the...

  • Sunday Explorers


    Sundays, November 1 - 29, Noon - 4 pm Our popular Sunday drop-in program returns for November. Join us for crafts, hikes, and animal meet & greets...

  • Retired Men’s Club


    Mondays, Oct 12 – Dec. 28, 10am – 1pm Do you enjoy stimulating discussions about politics or finance, or just getting together and sharing the...

  • #RaisingTodaysKids- Lecture by Josh Levs


    Lectures for parents and educators of children birth-10 years, focusing on the issues encountered while raising children in today’s world. Join...

  • Blood Pressure Screening


    1st Tuesday of the month, Nov. 3, Dec. 1  9:45 – 11:15 am No appointment necessary. Conducted by a registered nurse. Compliments of...



    Uncork your creativity and let go with Masters and Mixers, the first paint and sip party host in Fairfield County! Adults who want to learn to...

Show More...
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular Articles

  1. They Just Wanna Have Fun
    4 spots for girls' night out in Stamford
  2. What’s on Tap?
    4 beers to try during Oktoberfest
  3. Open House
    Realtor shares advice for first-time buyers
  4. Reused & Refashioned
    Artist Nancy Judd to display selections from her Recycle Runway Collection at the Stamford Museum
  5. Del Frisco’s Grille Opens in Landmark Square
    New location on Broad Street will serve handcrafted cocktails and creative American comfort...
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags