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Class Act

Dancer Jimmy Locust steps out of the spotlight to teach life lessons to children



Photograph: Mindy Vaccino

(page 1 of 2)

On paper Jimmy Locust is impressive: local business owner, professional dancer and choreographer, anti-bullying advocate, and mentor to hundreds of kids in Stamford and surrounding towns. In person he impresses even more with a positive, enthusiastic, focused and down-to-earth attitude that belies his Hollywood resumé. Jimmy, who lived in Los Angeles for many years before moving to Brooklyn and then Connecticut, danced with Michael Jackson at the 1995 MTV Video Music Awards. He has also performed at the Academy Awards and the Grammys, and in Paula Abdul music videos, among other marquee appearances.

Still, while sitting in a homegrown café in Black Rock, where he lives, it’s hard to imagine Jimmy anywhere but here. His face lights up when he talks about the children he teaches at the Locust Performing Arts Center, his dance studio in Stamford, where more than 460 students attend weekly for tap, hip-hop, modern dance, ballet, musical theater and a hearty dose of self-esteem. Jimmy has a vision for LPAC that goes way beyond business. “My branding is positivity and nurturing and love and healthy boundaries,” he says, “and taking the time to know all my students’ names and their families.”

He and his staff find something inspiring to say to every student at least once a week. “You’ll see walls break, a guard will come down and their eyes will light up,” Jimmy says. “A lot of kids don’t get enough [positive feedback]. Locust is a place where we make sure you get it.”

Jimmy knows from experience what it’s like to crave that kind of encouragement, to feel like an outcast. Unusually short for his age, the result of jaundice that stunted his growth from birth, he was teased relentlessly while growing up in Dayton, Ohio. He describes feeling like he was constantly fighting to catch up to his peers. Later, at four-foot-nine, the aspiring dancer was often overlooked for dancers who better fit the idealized—read statuesque—image of what a performer should look like.

That was not the case with legendary jazz master Gus Giordano, whom Jimmy considers a mentor. “He broke every rule in the book by putting me in his company. He saw that I wanted to be an artist, so he didn’t discriminate. I will always love him for that because that experience began this,” Jimmy says, referring to his studio and the special programs he runs.

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