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Clean Lines

Stylish design meets smooth function at Deane Inc.’s new Culinary Center in Stamford



Photograph: Jane Beiles

Food says a lot about a person’s lifestyle and values. Deane Inc. Principal Peter Deane says the same goes for the room where we prep and cook it. This basic premise is at the root of the needs of the modern homeowner, and is the reason the company constructed a new Culinary Center in Deane’s Stamford showroom. Here, the kitchen expert himself dishes on the new center and its special function.

What inspired you to create a new culinary center?
Peter Deane: Back in 2001, we opened our first culinary center. After twelve years, it was time to bring it up to today’s standards. My wife, Julia, runs Culinary Works and she needed a larger kitchen to accommodate clients. Now the center has double the space.

How does the redesign address the needs of a contemporary kitchen?
PD: We moved away from a traditional design to a transitional-contemporary look. The layout features sleek, clean lines—not a lot of heavy elements—and it’s functional. It’s all about material selection.

What materials were used? How do they reflect look and function?
PD: Bleached oak and taupe painted cabinetry made for a subtle color palette. Then we used a lot of brushed stainless, like the eight-foot range, which is a statement in itself. Bronze rivets accent the stainless hood, complementing the bronze decorative hardware used throughout. Underneath is a forty-eight-inch Wolf range with high CFMs for an ultra-functional design with an industrial look. Stainless grills and door panels match the hood, as do the custom metal feet on the island, which offer a transitional look. A tambour door hides small appliances, and the Sub-Zero refrigerator has a bronze glass insert that’s fingerprint-free.

How often should homeowners update their kitchens?
PD: Typically kitchen projects are initiated because of lifestyle changes or need, whether it’s a new house, or the cabinetry is old, or appliances need to be replaced.

What elements should every kitchen possess?
PD: Every kitchen needs a place to prep, a place to cook and a place to clean up. Beyond that, it depends on individual preference. The first thing we do for clients is a needs analysis. After that, I ask them to take a step back and focus on the bigger picture—how their kitchen needs to function. Do [they] entertain? How often do [they] shop? It’s easy to get caught up in the details (finishes, hardware), but more importantly it should accommodate your lifestyle.

What kitchen and cuisine trends are you seeing for 2014?
PD: Neutral earth tones such as gray and beige. There’s a real interest in a mix of materials and texture: woods, glass, marble, metals. For example, we topped the painted maple island with a corduroy walnut top, which shows the streaks of the original wood. It’s also a very ‘green’ product.

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